What the American gay rights movement can teach all social marketers

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Category Archives: Other People’s Work

What the American gay rights movement can teach all social marketers


The lesson is a simple one, fundamental even, but it is very often forgotten or ignored by social and cause marketers. It’s that you have to understand your audience, and frame your issue in terms they can understand and identify with. Consumer marketers live by this code, but in the world of activists and not-for-profits it simply isn’t intuitive.

Brand-hacking goes retail


For years, Adbusters and others have been defacing outdoor consumer ads to hijack their messages for their own means. But …

Want to be remembered? Learn the science of storytelling


People who think they are immune to marketing wiles, and consider themselves completely rational consumers, would do well to read the book. It not only talks about the power of storytelling to help recall the past accurately, but also shows how our storytelling minds can be made to play tricks on us by making us think stories we heard actually happened to us.

Increasing sharability with pinnable banners


Pinterest is a social media channel dominated by women. And many of those women go there to view and share fashion ideas. So how stupidly obvious is it that a major fashion brand would encourage consumers to share its online ads by making them more easily “pinnable”?

Book Review: Marketing in The Round


If the marketing leader in your life still doesn’t “get” that advertising, PR, digital and social media all have to be informed by a central strategy, this review offers you two options:

1) Buy them a copy of Marketing in The Round, and make them read it; or
2) Smack them upside the head with it.

Given that this review of current best practices is under 200 pages, I recommend the former option.

Why social media marketers should march to the beat of Chris Frantz


Will Chris’ daily time commitment to making a few posts and chatting with new friends sell more tickets or albums than not putting himself out there? I certainly assume so. But that’s not the point. What Chris has really achieved is what social media music marketers should really be reaching for: he is relevant and real, and people give a damn what he’s up to these days. And that, in our heavily media-filtered world, is priceless.